• Wil je een instrument leren bespelen? Of ben je een gepassioneerd muzikant, die afhaakt wanneer er bladmuziek bij komt kijken? Dit handige boekje is voor iedereen die wil leren noten lezen. Je leest wat verschillende noten en rusten betekenen, hoe maatsoorten worden aangegeven en hoe je die moet tellen. Bovendien maak je kennis met notenbalken, sleutels en nootnamen. Noten lezen kent straks voor jou geen geheimen meer!

    Michael Pilhofer voltooide een universitaire opleiding muziekeducatie en een opleiding tot uitvoerend jazzmuzikant.
    Holly Day is muziekjournalist. Ze schreef diverse boeken en artikelen.

  • Deze nieuwe editie van 'Muziektheorie voor Dummies' biedt je alle informatie die je nodig hebt om beats te produceren als een pro, om partituren te lezen en om te begrijpen waar een muziekstuk thuishoort in het muzikale spectrum. Componeer harmonieën en begeleidende melodieën voor instrumenten en stemmen, schrijf je eigen akkoorden en beheers toonladders, intervallen en tempo. Of je nu een carrière in de muziek ambieert of gewoon graag muziek luistert, met dit boek zul je muziek nog meer waarderen en zullen je handen kriebelen om zelf aan de slag te gaan!

    Michael Pilhofer voltooide een universitaire opleiding muziekeducatie en een opleiding tot uitvoerend jazzmuzikant. Holly Day is muziekjournalist. Ze schreef diverse boeken en artikelen.

  • New Paths, the seventh volume in the Writings of the Orpheus Institute, is a result of the third International Orpheus Academy for Music Theory. Five renowned scholars discuss a variety of topics related to romanticism, focusing especially on the years 1800-1840. In a much-needed historical and critical overview of the concept of organicism, John Neubauer ranges from its origins in Enlightenment biology to its aftermath in postmodernism.
    Janet Schmalfeldt shows that Beethoven's op.47 not only should be called the Bridgetower rather than the Kreutzer Sonata, but also that this makes a difference as to its meaning. Extreme contrasts between emotional and mechanical types of music in late Beethoven are explained
    by Scott Burnham as stagings of the limits of human subjectivity. Jim Samson discusses Chopin's little-known musical upbringing in Warsaw, arguing that his grounding in eighteenth-century aesthetics (as opposed to theory) has thus far been neglected. Finally, Susan Youens' case study of Franz Lachner's Heine songs sheds new light on radical experimentation by a so-called epigone in the period between Schubert and Schumann's miracle song year.

    With contributions by: Scott Burnham, John Neubauer, Jim Samson, Janet Schmalfeldt, Susan Youens.

  • Two-Dimensional Sonata Form is the first book dedicated to the combination of the movements of a multimovement sonata cycle with an overarching single-movement form that is itself organized as a sonata form.

    Drawing on a variety of historical and recent approaches to musical form (e.g., Marxian and Schoenbergian Formenlehre, Caplin's theory of formal functions, and Hepokoski and Darcy's Sonata Theory), it begins by developing an original theoretical framework for the analysis of this type of form that is so characteristic of the later nineteenth and early twentieth century.

    It then offers an in-depth examination of nine exemplary works by four Central European composers: the Piano Sonata in B minor and the symphonic poems Tasso and Die Ideale by Franz Liszt, Richard Strauss's tone poems Don Juan and Ein Heldenleben, the symphonic poem Pelleas und Melisande, the First String Quartet and the First Chamber Symphony by Arnold Schoenberg, and Alexander Zemlinsky's Second String Quartet.

  • In Musical Form, Forms & Formenlehre: Three Methodological Reflections, three eminent music theorists consider the fundamentals of musical form. They discuss how to analyze form in music and question the relevance of analytical theories and methods in general. They illustrate their basic concepts and concerns by offering some concrete analyses of works by Mozart (Idomeneo Overture, Jupiter Symphony) and Beethoven (First Symphony, Pastoral Symphony, Egmont Overture, and Die Ruinen von Athen Overture).

    The volume is divided into three parts, focusing on Caplin's "theory of formal functions," Hepokoski's concept of "dialogic form," and Webster's method of "multivalent analysis" respectively. Each part begins with an essay by one of the three authors. Subsequently, the two opposing authors comment on issues and analyses they consider to be problematic or underdeveloped, in a style that ranges from the gently critical to the overtly polemical. Finally, the author of the initial essay is given the opportunity to respond to the comments and to refine further his own fundamental ideas on musical form.

  • A revealing study of the physical presence of the musician in musical performance.
    Fingers slipping over guitar strings, the tap of a bow against the body of a cello, a pianist humming along to the music: contemporary composers often work with parasitic, non-conventional sounds such as these. Are they to be perceived as musical elements or do they shift attention to the physical effort of music-making, contact between a body and an instrument?

    Composer Paul Craenen explores ways in which the musician's body is revealed in musical performance. He leads us from Cage, Lachenmann, Kagel and their contemporaries to a discussion of how today's generation of young composers is writing a body paradigm into composition itself. Micro-temporal physical gestures and instrumental timbre provide the key to unveiling the physical presence of both a musician and a 'composing body'.

    The author's concept of 'intercorporeality', along with the idea of an alternating linear and non-linear relationship of the composing body to time, casts new light on the relationship between musicians, composers, and music consumers.

  • The musical thought and practice of canonical composers.
    What can music tell us-without words? Can it depict scenes, narrate stories, elucidate beliefs? And can it be an instrument through which we access the inner lives not only of musicians from the past but of ourselves, today?
    In Ohne Worte five scholars and performers probe these and related questions to illuminate both the experience and performance of nineteenth-century music. Drawing on a rich range of sources, they reveal the musical thought and practice of canonical composers like Berlioz, Mendelssohn, and Schumann. Their work challenges us to reconsider our musical practices and the voices manifested in them, and it encourages the creation of an art that is both historical and transcendental.

    /> Contributors:
    Jean-Pierre Bartoli (Université Paris-Sorbonne), Hubert Moßburger (Staatlichen Hochschule für Musik und Darstellende Kunst Stuttgart), Jeanne Roudet (Université Paris-Sorbonne), Douglass Seaton (Florida State University School of Music), Edoardo Torbianelli (Hochschule der Künste Bern)

  • The history of musical improvisation from the late Middle Ages to the early Baroque.
    Studying improvised music is always a challenge, due to its volatility and unpredictability. But what about studying musical improvisation from before the age of sound recordings? In this book three experts give their view on aspects of musical improvisation in the late medieval, renaissance, and early baroque periods. Historical sources show us how improvisation was an integral part of music education and how closely improvisation and composition were linked. This gives new insights into the way music was played in its original historical context and a new way to look at written scores from the past.
    Improvising Early Music will appeal to anyone interested in the historical background of our written musical heritage, and to musicians who want to gain a deeper insight in the way this music was created.

    Contributors:
    Johannes Menke (Schola Cantorum Basiliensis, Basel), Peter Schubert (Schulich School of Music, McGill University, Montreal), Rob C. Wegman (Princeton University)

  • Nouvelles perspectives en sémiotique.
    Tout est musique, et la musique nous accompagne partout : ces lieux communs n'ont jamais été si vrais qu'aujourd'hui, au temps de l'arrosage musical continuel. Cette ubiquité, loin d'être simplement une mode, nous oblige à repenser sémiotiquement la fonction et le fonctionnement de la musique.

    Les essais composant Sémiotique et vécu musical montrent dans quelle direction se dirigent les recherches de nos jours. L'analyse de l'expérience musicale, par exemple, détermine la réception affective, peut provoquer l'ébranlement intérieur, transformer le temps vécu, changer et déterminer les structures de l'expérience ainsi que l'expérientialité. L'expérience musicale est profondément liée à l'incarnation et à la corporalité. Elle peut redéfinir l'horizon de compréhension, moduler les attentes, déterminer et délimiter les contenus phénoménaux. Elle est fondamentalement conditionnée par l'interaction physique avec un instrument ou encore modelée par le studio d'enregistrement. L'intelligence artificielle et l'usage de robots dans des spectacles commencent à remettre en cause nos conceptions de l'expérience musicale. Ces nouvelles perspectives développées en sémiotique s'ouvrent nécessairement et impérativement aux sciences cognitives, aux nouvelles approches de la musicologie, à la transdisciplinarité et au transmédial. Le caractère innovant du présent ouvrage qui touche la théorie, la méthodologie et l'empirisme, témoigne de la vivacité, de l'inventivité et du dynamisme qui caractérisent la sémiotique toujours jeune, curieuse et surprenante.

    Contributors:
    Sylvain Brétéché (Aix-Marseille Université), Guillaume Deveney (Aix-Marseille Université), Carole Egger (Université de Strasbourg), Christine Esclapez (Aix-Marseille Université ), Márta Grabócz (Université de Strasbourg), Michel Imberty (Université de Paris X, Nanterre), Thomas Le Colleter (Université Paris-IV Sorbonne), Gabriel Manzaneque (Aix-Marseille Université), Zaven Paré (Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro), Isabelle Reck (Universite de Strasbourg), Mathias Rousselot (Aix-Marseille Université)

  • Wolfgang Rihm ( b. Karlsruhe, 1952) is the most performed living German composer. With his personal, expressive, and versatile music, he became the most prominent representative of his generation. His individual approach to music was established in the 1980s and he continues to explore and enlarge his original concepts today. His 1980s work is at the core of this book, more specifically his instrumental music: the Chiffre cycle and the string quartets. Thinking about Rihm includes reflecting on his interest in philosophy, his relation to fine arts, his awareness of principles found in nature, and his references to important composers from the past. His music is embedded in the past and the actuality in modernism and postmodernism. Notwithstanding Rihm's generosity in essays and introductions to his works, many aspects of the 'inner sound' of his music stay an elusive, ungraspable 'chiffre': a challenge for the analyst.

  • Identity and subjectivity in musical performances.
    Who is the "I" that performs? The arts of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries have pushed us relentlessly to reconsider our notions of the self, expression, and communication: to ask ourselves, again and again, who we think we are and how we can speak meaningfully to one another. Although in other performing arts studies, especially of theatre, the performance of selfhood and identity continues to be a matter of lively debate in both practice and theory, the question of how a sense of self is manifested through musical performance has been neglected. The authors of Voices, Bodies, Practices are all musician-researchers: the book employs artistic research to explore how embodied performing "voices" can emerge from the interactions of individual performers and composers, musical materials, instruments, mediating technologies, and performance contexts.

  • This volume is a collection of essays based on lectures given at the International Orpheus Academy for Music Theory on 'Music and Theory: Thoroughbass in Practice, Theory, and Improvisation'. Hence the point of departure was not 'Music Theory' as such, but the interaction between music theory, music history, performance practice, aesthetics, and related sciences. This multidisciplinary approach, with the accent on the interplay between music performance and music theory, is reflected in the contributions to this book.

    Thomas Christensen, in his contribution, shows how the development of tonal harmonic theory went hand in hand with the practice of thoroughbass. Both Robert Gjerdingen and Giorgio Sanguinetti focus on the Neapolitan tradition of partimento. Gjerdingen addresses the relation between the realization of partimenti and contrapuntal thinking, illustrated by examples of contrapuntal imitation and combination in partimenti, leading to the 'partimentofugue'. Sanguinetti elaborates on the history of this partimentofugue from the early 18th until the late 19th century. Rudolf Lutz, finally, presents his use of partimenti in educational practice, giving examples of how reviving this old practice can give new insights to composers, conductors and musicians.

  • The three Mozart/Da Ponte operas offer an inexhaustible wellspring for critical reflection, possessing a complexity and equivocation common to all great humane works. They have the potential to reflect and refract whatever locus of contemporaneity may be the starting point for enquiry. Thus, even postmodern and postmillennial concerns, far from seeming irrelevant to these operas, are instead given new perspectives by them, whilst the music and the dramatic situations have the multivalency to accept each refreshed pallet of interpretation without loss of their essential character. These operas seem perennially 'new'. In exploring the evergreen qualities of Don Giovanni and Le Nozze di Figaro, this collection of studies does not shun approaches that have foundations in established theory, but refracts them through such problems as the tension between operatic tradition and psychological realism, the co-existence of multiple yet equal plots, and the antagonism between the tenets of tradition and the need for self-actualization. In exploring such themes, the authors not only illuminate new aspects of Mozart's operatic compositions, but also probe the nature of musical analysis itself.
    GPRC label:

  • Profound theoretical and philosophical approach to contemporary music.
    Unsayable Music presents theoretical, critical and analytical reflections on key topics of contemporary music including acoustic, electroacoustic and digital music, and audiovisual and multimedia composition. Six essays by Paulo C. Chagas approaching music from different perspectives such as philosophy, sociology, cybernetics, musical semiotics, media, and critical studies. Chagas's practical experience, both as a composer of contemporary music and sound director of the Electronic Music Studio of Cologne, nourishes his observations on the specific creativity that emerges with the use of the technical apparatus, the development of the electronic music studio, the different aesthetics of electroacoustic music, and the forms of audiovisual and multimedia composition.
    The title Unsayable Music is a reference to Wittgenstein, who suggested that sound is only the surface of music and that the musical work conceals something more profound that can hardly be described by philosophical models or scientific theories.

  • Transdisciplinary and intermedial analysis of the experience of music.
    Nowadays musical semiotics no longer ignores the fundamental challenges raised by cognitive sciences, ethology, or linguistics. Creation, action and experience play an increasing role in how we understand music, a sounding structure impinging upon our body, our mind, and the world we live in. Not discarding music as a closed system, an integral experience of music demands a transdisciplinary dialogue with other domains as well. Music, Analysis, Experience brings together contributions by semioticians, performers, and scholars from cognitive sciences, philosophy, and cultural studies, and deals with these fundamental questionings. Transdisciplinary and intermedial approaches to music meet musicologically oriented contributions to classical music, pop music, South American song, opera, narratology, and philosophy.
    />
    Contributors:
    Paulo Chagas (University of California, Riverside), Isaac and Zelia Chueke (Universidade Federal do Paraná, OMF/Paris-Sorbonne), Maurizio Corbella (Università degli Studi di Milano), Ian Cross (University of Cambridge), Paulo F. de Castro (CESEM/Departamento de Ciências Musicais; FCSH Universidade Nova de Lisboa), Robert S. Hatten (University of Texas at Austin), David Huron (School of Music, Ohio State University), Jamie Liddle (The Open University), Gabriele Marino (University of Turin), Dario Martinelli (Kaunas University of Technology; International Semiotics Institute), Nicolas Marty (Université Paris-Sorbonne), Maarten Nellestijn (Utrecht University), Malgorzata Pawlowska (Academy of Music in Krakow), Mônica Pedrosa de Pádua (Federal University of Minas Gerais, UFMG), Piotr Podlipniak (Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan), Rebecca Thumpston (Keele University), Mieczyslaw Tomaszewski (Academy of Music in Krakow), Lea Maria Lucas Wierød (Aarhus University), Lawrence M. Zbikowski (University of Chicago)

  • This is a collection of essays based on lectures presented at the International Orpheus Academy for Music and Theory on "Historical Theory, Performance, and Meaning in Baroque Music".
    The often complex connections and intersections between, e.g., modal and tonal idioms, contrapuntal and harmonic organisation, were considered from various perspectives as to the transition (towards tonality) from the Renaissance to the Baroque era.

  • Questions concerning music and its inextricably intertwined and complex interface with time continue to fascinate musicians and scholars.
    For performers, the primary perception of music is arguably the way in which it unfolds in 'real time'; while for composers a work appears 'whole and entire', with the presence of the score having the potential to compress, and even eliminate, the perception of time as 'passing'.
    The paradoxical relationship between these two perspectives, and the subtle mediations at the interface between them with which both performers and composers engage, form the subject matter of this collection of studies. The various contributors address the temporal significance of specific topics such as notation, tempo, metre and rhythm within broader contexts of performance, composition, aesthetics and philosophy. The aim is to present novel ideas about music and time that provide particular insight into musical practice and the world of artistic research.

    With contributions by: Bruce Brubaker, Pascal Decroupet, Mark Delaere, Justin London, Ian Pace.

  • Deleuze's and Guattari's philosophy in the field of artistic research
    Gilles Deleuze's intriguing concept of the dark precursor refers to intensive processes of energetic flows passing between fields of different potentials. Fleetingly used in Difference and Repetition, it remained underexplored in Deleuze's subsequent work. In this collection of essays numerous contributors offer perspectives on Deleuze's concept of the dark precursor as it affects artistic research, providing a wide-ranging panorama on the intersection between music, art, philosophy, and scholarship.

    The forty-eight chapters in this publication present a kaleidoscopic view of different fields of knowledge and artistic practices, exposing for the first time the diversity and richness of a world situated between artistic research and the philosophy of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari. Within different understandings of artistic research, the authors-composers, architects, performers, philosophers, sculptors, film-makers, painters, writers, and activists-map practices and invent concepts, contributing to a creative expansion of horizons, materials, and methodologies.

    Contributors
    VOLUME 1: Paulo de Assis, Arno Böhler, Edward Campbell, Diego Castro-Magas, Pascale Criton, Zornitsa Dimitrova, Lois Fitch, Mike Fletcher, Paolo Galli, Lindsay Gianoukas, Keir GoGwilt, Oleg Lebedev, Jimmie LeBlanc, Nicolas Marty, Frédéric Mathevet, Vincent Meelberg, Catarina Pombo Nabais, Tero Nauha, Gabriel Paiuk, Martin Scherzinger, Einar Torfi Einarsson, Steve Tromans, Toshiya Ueno, Susanne Valerie, Audrone Zukauskaite

    VOLUME 2: Éric Alliez, Manola Antonioli, Jurate Baranova, Zsuzsa Baross, Anna Barseghian, Ian Buchanan, Elena del Río, Luis de Miranda, Lucia D'Errico, Lilija Duobliene, Adreis Echzehn, Jae Emerling, Verina Gfader, Ronny Hardliz, Rahma Khazam, Stefan Kristensen, Erin Manning, John Miers, Elfie Miklautz, Marc Ngui, Andreia Oliveira, Federica Pallaver, Andrej Radman, Felix Rebolledo, Anne Sauvagnargues, Janae Sholtz, Mhairi Vari, Mick Wilson, Elisabet Yanagisawa

  • Unique focus on the relation between artistic research and the philosophy of Gilles Deleuze.
    Aberrant Nuptials explores the diversity and richness of the interactions between artistic research and Deleuze studies. "Aberrant nuptials" is the expression Gilles Deleuze uses to refer to productive encounters between systems characterised by fundamental difference. More than imitation, representation, or reproduction, these encounters foster creative flows of energy, generating new material configurations and intensive experiences. Within different understandings of artistic research, the contributors to this book-architects, composers, film-makers, painters, performers, philosophers, sculptors, and writers-map current practices at the intersection between music, art, and philosophy, contributing to an expansion of horizons and methodologies. Written by established Deleuze scholars who have been working on interferences between art and philosophy, and by musicians and artists who have been reflecting Deleuzian and Post-Deleuzian discourses in their artworks, this volume reflects the current relevance of artistic research and Deleuze studies for the arts.

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