• The importance of Bartholomew's oeuvre and cultural life under the reign of Manfred.
    An important chapter in the rediscovery of Aristotle in the Middle Ages is the oeuvre of Bartholomew of Messina (Bartholomaeus de Messana), a translator at the court of Manfred, King of Sicily (1258-1266). However, the impact of both Bartholomew and Manfred on the cultural and intellectual life of their time remains understudied, especially in comparison to the attention received by the translator's contemporary, William of Moerbeke, and by the King's father, Frederick II of Hohenstaufen. This volume contributes to the exploration of this field of research in a twofold way. It discusses the nature and importance of Bartholomew's oeuvre (and especially his translations of Aristotle). Moreover, by situating Bartholomew's activity in a broader context Translating at the Court pays special attention to cultural life under the reign of Manfred.

    Contributors:
    Pieter Beullens (KU Leuven), Charles Burnett (Warburg Institute, London), Valérie Cordonier (CNRS - KU Leuven), Pieter De Leemans (KU Leuven), Fulvio Delle Donne (Università della Basilicata), Elisabeth Dévière (KU Leuven), Michael Dunne (National University of Ireland, Maynooth), Dimitri Gutas (Yale University), +Kotzia Paraskevi (Aristotle University,Thessaloniki), Alessandra Perriccioli Saggese (Seconda Università di Napoli), Giacinta Spinosa (Università di Cassino), Gudrun Vuillemin-Diem (Thomas-Institut, Köln), Steven J. Williams (New Mexico Highlands University), Mauro Zonta (Sapienza Università di Roma)

  • First ever edition of the Latin translation of Ptolemy's masterwork.
    This is the first edition ever of Moerbeke's Latin translation of Ptolemy's celebrated astrological handbook, known under the title Tetrabiblos or Quadripartitum (opus). Ptolemy's treatise (composed after 141 AD) offers a systematic overview of astrological science and had, together with his Almagest, an enormous influence up until the 17th century. In the Latin Middle Ages the work was mostly known through translations from the Arabic. William of Moerbeke's translation was made directly from the Greek and it is a major scholarly achievement manifesting not only Moerbeke's genius as a translator, but also as a scientist. The edition is accompanied by extensive Greek-Latin indices, which give evidence of Moerbeke's astonishing enrichment of the Latin vocabulary, which he needed both to translate the technical scientific vocabulary and to cope with the many new terms Ptolemy created. The introduction examines Moerbeke's translation method and situates the Latin translation within the tradition of the Greek text. This edition makes possible a better assessment of the great medieval translator and also contributes to a better understanding of the Greek text of Ptolemy's masterwork.

  • New insights into Pietro d'Abano's unique approach to translations.
    The commentary of Pietro d'Abano on Bartholomew's Latin translation of Pseudo-Aristotle's Problemata Physica, published in 1310, constitutes an important historical source for the investigation of the complex relationship between text, translation, and commentary in a non-curricular part of the corpus Aristotelicum.
    As the eight articles in this volume show, the study of Pietro's commentary not only provides valuable insights into the manner in which a commentator deals with the problems of a translated text, but will also bring to light the idiosyncrasy of Pietro's approach in comparison to his contemporaries and successors, the particularities of his commentary in light of the habitual exegetical practices applied in the teaching of regular curricular texts, as well as the influence of philosophical traditions outside the strict framework of the medieval arts faculty.

    Contributors:
    Joan Cadden (University of California, Davis), Gijs Coucke (KU Leuven), Béatrice Delaurenti (École des Hautes Études et Sciences Sociales - Paris), Pieter De Leemans (KU Leuven), Françoise Guichard-Tesson (KU Leuven), Danielle Jacquart (École Pratique des Hautes Études - Paris), Christian Meyer (Centre d'Études supérieures de la Renaissance - Tours), Iolanda Ventura (CNRS - Université d'Orléans)

  • The present volume contains a collection of papers on the reception of Aristotle's Problemata, a multifaceted text asking various questions about medical, scientific or everyday topics. This text is one of the most neglected Aristotelian treatises, because of its heterogeneous character and its so-called 'inauthenticity'. It has been the subject of a complex transmission. In ancient times, Aristotle's text has been augmented and adapted, while still other authors composed similar collections of Problemata. In the Middle Ages, Problemata collections have been translated into Arabic, Latin, and Middle French, each translation being characterized by its own particularities. The Latin translation lead to an extremely influential commentary by the Italian physician Peter of Abano, whereas Evrart de Conty, who made the Middle French translation, added himself a commentary to each discussed problem, often using Peter of Abano's text as source. Also in the Renaissance, the Problemata appealed to the interest of physicians and philosophers. In their contributions to this book, the authors analyse this complex web of relations between source-texts, translations, and commentaries, in different times and tongues.

  • Medieval translators played an important role in the development and evolution of a scientific lexicon. At a time when most scholars deferred to authority, the translations of canonical texts assumed great importance. Moreover, translation occurred at two levels in the Middle Ages. First, Greek or Arabic texts were translated into the learned language, Latin. Second, Latin texts became source-texts themselves, to be translated into the vernaculars as their importance across Europe started to increase. The situation of the respective translators at these two levels was fundamentally different: whereas the former could rely on a long tradition of scientific discourse, the latter had the enormous responsibility of actually developing a scientific vocabulary. The contributions in the present volume investigate both levels, greatly illuminating the emergence of the scientific terminology and concepts that became so fundamental in early modern intellectual discourse. The scientific disciplines covered in the book include, among others, medicine, biology, astronomy, and physics.

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