Leuven University Press

  • This book examines the place of physical bodies, a major topic of natural philosophy that has occupied philosophers since antiquity. Aristotle's conceptions of place (topos) and the void (kenon), as expounded in the Physics, were systematically repudiated by John Philoponus (ca. 485-570) in his philosophical commentary on that work. The primary philosophical concern of the present study is the in-depth investigation of the concept of place established by Philoponus, putting forward the claim that the latter offers satisfactory solutions to problems raised by Aristotle and the Aristotelian tradition regarding the nature of place. Philoponus' account proposes a specific physical model of how physical bodies exist and move in place, and regards place as an intrinsic reality of the physical cosmos. Due to exactly this model, his account may be considered as strictly pertaining to the study of physics, thereby constituting a remarkable episode in the history of philosophy and science.

  • Articles 56-59 of Henry of Ghent's Summa is devoted to the trinitarian properties. Henry was the most important Christian theological thinker in the last quarter of the 13th century and his works were influential not only in his lifetime, but also in the following century and into the Renaissance.

    Henry's Quaestiones ordinariae (Summa), articles 56-59 deal with the trinitarian properties and relations, topics of Henry's lectures at the university in Paris. In these articles, dated around 1286, Henry treats generation, a property unique to the Father, and being generated, a property unique to the Son.

    The university in Paris distributed articles 56-59 by means of two successive exemplars divided into peciae. Manuscripts copied from each have survived and the text of the critical edition has been established based upon the reconstructed texts of these two exemplars.

  • Missionaries have been subject to academic and societal debate. Some scholars highlight their contribution to the spread of modernity and development among local societies, whereas others question their motives and emphasise their inseparable connection with colonialism. In this volume, fifteen authors - from both Europe and the Global South - address these often polemical positions by focusing on education, one of the most prominent fields in which missionaries have been active. They elaborate on Protestantism as well as Catholicism, work with cases from the 18th to the 21st century, and cover different colonial empires in Asia and Africa. The volume introduces new angles, such as gender, the agency of the local population, and the perspective of the child.

    Contributors: Aditi Athreya (KU Leuven), Joseph Bara (Indian Institute of Dalit Studies), Mary Chepkemoi (Kenyatta University), Kim Christiaens (KADOC-KU Leuven), Maaike Derksen (Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen), Rinald D'Souza (KU Leuven), Carine Dujardin (KADOC-KU Leuven), Idesbald Goddeeris (KU Leuven), Gwendal Rannou (Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne), Parimala V. Rao (Jawaharlal Nehru University), Marleen Reichgelt (Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen), Lourens van Haaften (KU Leuven), Ellen Vea Rosnes (VID Specialized University), Pieter Verstraete (KU Leuven), Meng Wang (University of Sydney)

  • Translating and interpreting are unpredictable social practices framed by historical, ethical, and political constraints. Using the concepts of situatedness and performativity as anchors, the authors examine translation practices from the perspectives of identity performance, cultural mediation, historical reframing, and professional training. As such, the chapters focus on enacted events and conditioned practices by exploring production processes and the social, historical, and cultural conditions of the field. These outlooks shift our attention to social and institutionalized acts of translating and interpreting, considering also the materiality of bodies, artefacts, and technologies involved in these scenes.

  • Early modern heraldry was far from a nostalgic remnant from a feudal past. From the Reformation to the French Revolution, aspiring men seized on these signs to position themselves in a changing society, imbuing heraldic tradition with fresh meaning. Whereas post-medieval developments are all too often described in terms of decadence and stifling formality, recent studies rightly stress the dynamic capacity of bearing arms.

    Heraldic Hierarchies aims to correct former misconceptions. Contributing authors rethink the influence of shifting notions of nobility on armorial display and expand this topic to heraldry's share in shaping and contesting status. Moreover, addressing a common thread, the volume explores how emerging states turned the heraldic experience into an instrument of power and policy. Contributing to debates on social and noble identity, Heraldic Hierarchies uncovers a vital and surprising aspect of the pre-modern hierarchical world.

  • New Paths, the seventh volume in the Writings of the Orpheus Institute, is a result of the third International Orpheus Academy for Music Theory. Five renowned scholars discuss a variety of topics related to romanticism, focusing especially on the years 1800-1840. In a much-needed historical and critical overview of the concept of organicism, John Neubauer ranges from its origins in Enlightenment biology to its aftermath in postmodernism.
    Janet Schmalfeldt shows that Beethoven's op.47 not only should be called the Bridgetower rather than the Kreutzer Sonata, but also that this makes a difference as to its meaning. Extreme contrasts between emotional and mechanical types of music in late Beethoven are explained
    by Scott Burnham as stagings of the limits of human subjectivity. Jim Samson discusses Chopin's little-known musical upbringing in Warsaw, arguing that his grounding in eighteenth-century aesthetics (as opposed to theory) has thus far been neglected. Finally, Susan Youens' case study of Franz Lachner's Heine songs sheds new light on radical experimentation by a so-called epigone in the period between Schubert and Schumann's miracle song year.

    With contributions by: Scott Burnham, John Neubauer, Jim Samson, Janet Schmalfeldt, Susan Youens.

  • Applications, possibilities, and limitations of handheld XRF in art conservation and archaeology.

    Over the last decade the technique of X-ray fluorescence has evolved, from dependence on laboratory-based standalone units to field use of portable and lightweight handheld devices. These portable instruments have given researchers in art conservation and archaeology the opportunity to study a broad range of materials with greater accessibility and flexibility than ever before.

    In addition, the low relative cost of handheld XRF has led many museums, academic institutions, and cultural centres to invest in the devices for routine materials analysis purposes. Although these instruments often greatly simplify data collection, proper selection of analysis conditions and interpretation of the data still require an understanding of the principles of x-ray spectroscopy. These instruments are often marketed and used as 'point and shoot' solutions; however, their inexpert use can easily generate deceptive or erroneous results.

    This volume focuses specifically on the applications, possibilities, and limitations of handheld XRF in art conservation and archaeology. The papers deal with experimental methodologies, protocols, and possibilities of handheld XRF analysis in dealing with the complexity of materials encountered in this research.

    Contributors:
    J. Aimers (State University of New York), T. Barrett (University of Iowa), A. Bezur (The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston), R. Brill (Corning Museum of Glass), F. Casadio (Art Institute of Chicago), M. Donais (Saint Anselm College), D. Farthing (State University of New York), J. Furgeson (University of Missouri), D. George (Saint Anselm College), B. Kaiser (Bruker Elemental), A. Kaplan (Getty Conservation Institute), J. Lang, (University of Iowa), J. Mass (Winterthur Museum), C. Matsen (Winterthur Museum), C. McGlinchey (Museum of Modern Art), H. Neff (California State University Long Beach), C. Patterson (Getty Conservation Institute), R. Shannon (Bruker-Elemental), A. Shugar (Buffalo State College), J. Sirois (Canadian Conservation Institute), D. Smith (National Gallery of Art), D. Stulik (Getty Conservation Institute), K. Trentelman (Getty Conservation Institute), N. Turner (Getty Conservation Institute), F. Paredes Umaña (University of Pennsylvania), B. Voorhies (University of California), J. Wade (National Science Foundation)

  • Based on intensive research in the archives of six countries, this monograph presents an in-depth analysis of Belgium's monetary and financial history during the Second World War. Exploring Belgium's financial and business links with Germany, France, The Netherlands, Great Britain, the United States, and the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, the study focuses on the roles played in this complex wartime network by the Central Bank and private bankers in Brussels, by the Belgian government in exile in London, and by the Belgian minister plenipotentiary in New York. Among the many subjects arising in the course of the analysis are: German attempts to plunder Belgium and Belgian resistance strategies; the peripeteia of the Belgian gold reserve, given in custody to the central banks of France and Great Britain; the role of the Belgian Congo; Belgium's participation in the discussions leading up to the Bretton Woods conference; and the negotiations for creating a Customs Union, the so-called Benelux, blueprint for the 1958 Treaty of Rome. The final part of the book analyzes the famous monetary reform devised by Belgian Minister of Finance Camille Gutt at the liberation of the country in September 1944. A Small Nation in the Turmoil of the Second World War is a magisterial contribution to European history, Belgian history, and the history of the Second World War.

  • For all archaeological artefactual evidence, the study of the provenance, production technology and trade of raw materials must be based on archaeometry. Whereas the study of the provenance and trade of stone and ceramics is already well advanced, this is not necessarily the case for ancient glass. The nature of the raw materials used and the geographical location of their transformation into artefacts often remain unclear. Currently, these questions are addressed by the use of radiogenic isotope analysis. With the specific information the technique provides, archaeologists can further their understanding of the of ancient glass production, based not only on typo-morphological features but also on exact scientific methods. The book captures the state of the art in this rapidly advancing field. It includes methodological papers on isotope analysis, innovative applications of several isotope systems to current questions in glass and glaze research, and advances in the knowledge of the economy of vitreous materials.

  • Gilles Deleuze is among the twentieth century's most important philosophers of difference. The style of his extended oeuvre is so extremely dense and cryptic that reading and appreciating it require an unusual degree of openness and a willingness to enter a complicated but extremely rich system of thought. The abundant debates with and references to a variety of authors of many different domains; the sophisticated conceptual framework; the creation of new concepts and the injection of existing concepts with new meanings - all this makes his oeuvre difficult to grasp.

    This book can be seen as a guide to reading Deleuze, but at the same time it is a direct confrontation with issues at stake, particularly the debate with and against psychoanalysis. This debate not only offers the occasion to find an entrance to Deleuze's basic thought, but also throws the reader into the middle of the dispute. The book provides a clear and perspicuous overview of subject matter of interest to psychoanalysts, Deleuzean or otherwise.

  • The soul-body problem was among the most controversial issues discussed in 13th century Europe, and it continues to capture much attention today as the quest to understand human identity becomes more and more urgent. What made the discussion about this problem particularly interesting in the scholastic period was the tension between the traditional dualist doctrines and a growing need to affirm the unity of the human being. This debate is frequently interpreted as a conflict between the 'new' philosophy, conveyed by the rediscovered works of Aristotle and his followers, and doctrinal requirements, especially the belief in the soul's immortality. However, a thorough examination of Parisian texts, written between approximately 1150 and 1260, leads us to conclusions which may seem surprising. In this book, the study and edition of some little-known texts of Hugh of St-Cher and his contemporaries reveals an extremely rich and colourful picture of the Parisian anthropological debate of the time. This book also offers an opportunity to reconsider some received views concerning medieval philosophy, such as the conviction that the notion of 'person' did not play any major role in the anthropological controversies. The study covers a wide range of authors, from Gilbert of Poitiers to Thomas Aquinas, and it is partly based on previously unedited material, published for the first time in the Appendix.

  • Aristotle's treatise On the Soul figures among the most influential texts in the intellectual history of the West. It is the first systematic treatise on the nature and functioning of the human soul, presenting Aristotle's authoritative analyses of, among others, sense perception, imagination, memory, and intellect. The ongoing debates on this difficult work continue the commentary tradition that dates back to antiquity. This volume offers a selection of papers by distinguished scholars, exploring the ancient perspectives on Aristotle's De anima, from Aristotle's earliest successors through the Aristotelian Commentators at the end of Antiquity. It constitutes a twin publication with a volume entitled Medieval Perspectives on Aristotle's De anima (to be published in the Series 'Philosophes Médiévaux', Peeters Publ.), both volumes appearing to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the De Wulf Mansion Centre for Ancient, Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy at K.U. Leuven and U.C. Louvain.

    Contributions by: Enrico Berti, Klaus Corcilius, Frans de Haas, Andrea Falcon, Patrick Macfarlane, Pierre-Marie Morel, Ronald Polansky, R.W. Sharples, Nathanael Stein, Annick Stevens, Joel Yurdin, Marco Zingano.

  • The capacity to mount stone tools in or on a handle is considered an important innovation in past human behaviour. The insight to assemble two different materials (organic and inorganic) into a better functioning entity indicates the presence of the required mental capacity and technological expertise. Although the identification of stone tool use based on microscopic analysis was introduced in the 1960s, distinguishing between hand-held and hafted tool use has remained a more difficult issue. This volume introduces a methodology, based on a systematic, in-depth study of prehension and hafting traces on experimental stone artefacts, which allows their recognition in archaeological assemblages. The author proposes a number of distinctive macro- and microscopic wear traits for identifying hand-held and hafted stone tools and for identifying the exact hafting arrangement. Tested hafting arrangements vary according to the articulation between stone tool and handle, and to the raw materials and fixation agents used. Tool uses include various motions and worked materials. This largely experimental investigation concludes in a blind testing of the reliability of the method itself, showing that a wider application of the designed method has the potential to contribute significantly to our understanding of technological changes and evolutions and past human behaviour.

  • In Musical Form, Forms & Formenlehre: Three Methodological Reflections, three eminent music theorists consider the fundamentals of musical form. They discuss how to analyze form in music and question the relevance of analytical theories and methods in general. They illustrate their basic concepts and concerns by offering some concrete analyses of works by Mozart (Idomeneo Overture, Jupiter Symphony) and Beethoven (First Symphony, Pastoral Symphony, Egmont Overture, and Die Ruinen von Athen Overture).

    The volume is divided into three parts, focusing on Caplin's "theory of formal functions," Hepokoski's concept of "dialogic form," and Webster's method of "multivalent analysis" respectively. Each part begins with an essay by one of the three authors. Subsequently, the two opposing authors comment on issues and analyses they consider to be problematic or underdeveloped, in a style that ranges from the gently critical to the overtly polemical. Finally, the author of the initial essay is given the opportunity to respond to the comments and to refine further his own fundamental ideas on musical form.

  • The Sagalassos Archaeological Research Project has made interdisciplinary practices part of its scientific strategy from the very beginning. The project is internationally acknowledged for important achievements in this respect. Aspects of its approach to ancient Sagalassos can be considered ground-breaking for the archaeology of Anatolia and the wider fields of classical and Roman archaeology.

    Now that its first project director, Professor Marc Waelkens - University of Leuven -, is at the stage of shifting practices, from an active academic career to an active academic retirement, this volume represents an excellent opportunity to reflect on the wider impact of the Sagalassos Archaeological Research Project. The contributors to the honorific publication build on the methods and practices of interdisciplinary archaeology from a wide variety of angles, in order to highlight the crucial role of interdisciplinary research for creating progress in the interpretation of the human past or nurture developments in their own disciplines. In particular, the contributors consider how the parcours of the Sagalassos Project helped to pave their ways.

    Contributors are international authorities in the field of Anatolian and classical archaeology, bio-archaeology, geo-archaeology, history and cultural heritage.

  • The variety and complexity of cadence.
    The concept of closure is crucial to understanding music from the "classical" style. This volume focuses on the primary means of achieving closure in tonal music: the cadence. Written by leading North American and European scholars, the nine essays assembled in this volume seek to account for the great variety and complexity inherent in the cadence by approaching it from different (sub)disciplinary angles, including music-analytical, theoretical, historical, psychological (experimental), as well as linguistic. Each of these essays challenges, in one way or another, our common notion of cadence. Controversial viewpoints between the essays are highlighted by numerous cross-references. Given the ubiquity of cadences in tonal music in general, this volume is aimed not only at a broad portion of the academic community, scholars and students alike, but also at music performers.

    Contributors:
    Pieter Bergé (KU Leuven), Poundie Burstein (City University of New York), Vasili Byros (Northwestern University), William Caplin (McGill University), Felix Diergarten (Schola Cantorum Basiliensis), Nathan John Martin (Yale University / KU Leuven), Danuta Mirka (University of Southampton), Markus Neuwirth (KU Leuven), Julie Pedneault-Deslauriers (University of Ottawa), Martin Rohrmeier (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), and David Sears (McGill University)

  • The importance of Bartholomew's oeuvre and cultural life under the reign of Manfred.
    An important chapter in the rediscovery of Aristotle in the Middle Ages is the oeuvre of Bartholomew of Messina (Bartholomaeus de Messana), a translator at the court of Manfred, King of Sicily (1258-1266). However, the impact of both Bartholomew and Manfred on the cultural and intellectual life of their time remains understudied, especially in comparison to the attention received by the translator's contemporary, William of Moerbeke, and by the King's father, Frederick II of Hohenstaufen. This volume contributes to the exploration of this field of research in a twofold way. It discusses the nature and importance of Bartholomew's oeuvre (and especially his translations of Aristotle). Moreover, by situating Bartholomew's activity in a broader context Translating at the Court pays special attention to cultural life under the reign of Manfred.

    Contributors:
    Pieter Beullens (KU Leuven), Charles Burnett (Warburg Institute, London), Valérie Cordonier (CNRS - KU Leuven), Pieter De Leemans (KU Leuven), Fulvio Delle Donne (Università della Basilicata), Elisabeth Dévière (KU Leuven), Michael Dunne (National University of Ireland, Maynooth), Dimitri Gutas (Yale University), +Kotzia Paraskevi (Aristotle University,Thessaloniki), Alessandra Perriccioli Saggese (Seconda Università di Napoli), Giacinta Spinosa (Università di Cassino), Gudrun Vuillemin-Diem (Thomas-Institut, Köln), Steven J. Williams (New Mexico Highlands University), Mauro Zonta (Sapienza Università di Roma)

  • The musical thought and practice of canonical composers.
    What can music tell us-without words? Can it depict scenes, narrate stories, elucidate beliefs? And can it be an instrument through which we access the inner lives not only of musicians from the past but of ourselves, today?
    In Ohne Worte five scholars and performers probe these and related questions to illuminate both the experience and performance of nineteenth-century music. Drawing on a rich range of sources, they reveal the musical thought and practice of canonical composers like Berlioz, Mendelssohn, and Schumann. Their work challenges us to reconsider our musical practices and the voices manifested in them, and it encourages the creation of an art that is both historical and transcendental.

    /> Contributors:
    Jean-Pierre Bartoli (Université Paris-Sorbonne), Hubert Moßburger (Staatlichen Hochschule für Musik und Darstellende Kunst Stuttgart), Jeanne Roudet (Université Paris-Sorbonne), Douglass Seaton (Florida State University School of Music), Edoardo Torbianelli (Hochschule der Künste Bern)

  • The history of musical improvisation from the late Middle Ages to the early Baroque.
    Studying improvised music is always a challenge, due to its volatility and unpredictability. But what about studying musical improvisation from before the age of sound recordings? In this book three experts give their view on aspects of musical improvisation in the late medieval, renaissance, and early baroque periods. Historical sources show us how improvisation was an integral part of music education and how closely improvisation and composition were linked. This gives new insights into the way music was played in its original historical context and a new way to look at written scores from the past.
    Improvising Early Music will appeal to anyone interested in the historical background of our written musical heritage, and to musicians who want to gain a deeper insight in the way this music was created.

    Contributors:
    Johannes Menke (Schola Cantorum Basiliensis, Basel), Peter Schubert (Schulich School of Music, McGill University, Montreal), Rob C. Wegman (Princeton University)

  • In this thorough textual, historical, and doctrinal study the author seeks to clarify the relationship between two prominent mystics of the fourteenth century: Meister Eckhart, the German Dominican, and Jan van Ruusbroec, the Brabantine Augustinian. Special attention is paid to Ruusbroec's criticism of mystical tenets circulating in Brabant at that time which were both textually and doctrinally related to Eckhart's condemned propositions in the papal bull In agro dominico. This fact implies that Ruusbroec was confronted with the impact of the condemnation of Eckhart's doctrines on the people in Brabant. Situating Ruusbroec's life and works within the aftermath of Eckhart's arrival, the author elucidates Ruusbroec's position regarding the relevant mystical themes in the later Middle Ages, and follows a process of critical inheritance of mystical tradition from Eckhart to Ruusbroec.

  • The carillon, the world's largest musical instrument, originated in the 16th century when inhabitants of the Low Countries started to produce music on bells in church and city towers. Today, carillon music still fills the soundscape of cities in Belgium and the Netherlands. Since the First World War, carillon music has become popular in the United States, where it adds a spiritual dimension to public parks and university campuses.

    'Singing Bronze' opens up the fascinating world of the carillon to the reader. It tells the great stories of European and American carillon history: the quest for the perfect musical bell, the fate of carillons in times of revolt and war, the role of patrons such as John D. Rockefeller Jr. and Herbert Hoover in the development of American carillon culture, and the battle between singing bronze and carillon electronics.

    Richly illustrated with original photographs and etchings, Singing Bronze tells how people developed, played, and enjoyed bell music. With this book, a fascinating history that is yet little known is made available for a wide public.

  • First ever edition of the Latin translation of Ptolemy's masterwork.
    This is the first edition ever of Moerbeke's Latin translation of Ptolemy's celebrated astrological handbook, known under the title Tetrabiblos or Quadripartitum (opus). Ptolemy's treatise (composed after 141 AD) offers a systematic overview of astrological science and had, together with his Almagest, an enormous influence up until the 17th century. In the Latin Middle Ages the work was mostly known through translations from the Arabic. William of Moerbeke's translation was made directly from the Greek and it is a major scholarly achievement manifesting not only Moerbeke's genius as a translator, but also as a scientist. The edition is accompanied by extensive Greek-Latin indices, which give evidence of Moerbeke's astonishing enrichment of the Latin vocabulary, which he needed both to translate the technical scientific vocabulary and to cope with the many new terms Ptolemy created. The introduction examines Moerbeke's translation method and situates the Latin translation within the tradition of the Greek text. This edition makes possible a better assessment of the great medieval translator and also contributes to a better understanding of the Greek text of Ptolemy's masterwork.

  • The balance sheet of 50 years of development aid
    Over the past 50 years the West has invested over 3000 billion euro in development aid and already tackled many problems. Now more and more countries and organisations present themselves on the development aid scene, including China, India, and foundations such as the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Companies, trade unions, co-operatives, schools and towns set up their own projects in remote African regions.

    But can each and everybody become a development worker? Who decides what is acceptable and what is not? What is the role of the developing countries themselves? Who can tell what is good aid and what is bad aid? Is it a free market allowing everybody to do what he wants? A market without rules, with a lot of competition and little cooperation?

    This book draws up the balance sheet of 50 years of development aid and provides an overview of all relevant players, of opportunities and obstacles, of successes and failures. It details numerous examples and information on development projects from all over the world. Readers may be tempted to get involved in development aid, but they will also be more cautious than before.

  • Etudes philosophiques des cas freudiens.
    Dora, l'Homme aux rats, Hans, le Président Schreber, l'Homme aux loups... les cas freudiens sont célèbres, mais que sont-ils vraiment : des aperçus biographiques ? Des récits de cure ? On y a longtemps vu des témoignages de la manière dont les théories freudiennes ont « jailli » de l'expérience clinique. Les articles de ce recueil y font voir autre chose : des échantillons d'une pensée qui s'essaie, se met à l'épreuve, se corrige et se réinvente sans cesse ; des analyses qui interrogent la tension toujours précaire entre le normal et le pathologique. Psychanalyse et philosophie se rencontrent ici : qu'est-ce que bien vivre ? Etre en bonne santé, sans doute, s'il est vrai, comme l'affirme Freud, qu'il n'y a d'âme qu'incarnée. Mais existe-t-il une santé de l'âme ? Que serait une santé qui soit autant psychique que corporelle ? Les commentaires des grands cas freudiens réunis dans ce volume circulent à travers l'oeuvre fondatrice de la psychanalyse en questionnant autant qu'en instruisant.

    Collaborateurs / Contributors:
    Jens De Vleminck (Ghent University), Tomas Geyskens (Leuven), Elissa Marder (Emory University, Atlanta), Beatriz Santos (Paris), Patrick Vandermeersch (University of Groningen), Philippe Van Haute (Radboud Universiteit, Nijmegen), Herman Westerink (Radboud Universiteit, Nijmegen)

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